Featured Titles Let’s Code, Girls!

Inspire young listeners to learn about computer science and technology with the new Girls Who Code audiobooks. Plus, find more STEM listens here.
 
 

Author Reshma Saujani in the studio

Since 2012, the organization Girls Who Code has taught computing skills to and inspired over 40,000 girls across America. Now its founder, Reshma Saujani, wants to inspire even more listeners to become coders! With down-to-earth explanations of coding principles and real-life stories of girls and women working at places like Pixar and NASA, this audiobook shows what a huge role computer science plays in our lives and how much fun it can be!

Saujani told The New York Times, “I wanted to create a series of books that girls could see themselves in, where you could sneak in the algorithms and you sneak in the coding.” Hear a clip from GIRLS WHO CODE, read by the author, below.

Emily Parliman, editor at Listening Library, shares more about Reshma Saujani’s mission, and why listeners will be inspired to start coding by these stories, below.

Find more Sneaky STEM listens in our featured collection.

by Emily Parliman, Editor at Listening Library

Did you know that the gender gap in computing has actually been getting worse since the 1980s? In 1984, 37% of all computer science graduates were women. Now women make up just 18% of graduates. By 2020, there will be 1.4 million jobs available in computing related fields. US graduates are on track to fill 29% of those jobs, yet women are on track to fill just 3%.*

Did you know that some of the major pioneers in computer technology were women? Think: Ada Lovelace and Grace Hopper, among others.

We were surprised to learn these facts when Reshma Saujani came to the Penguin Young Readers office to talk about the nonprofit organization she founded, Girls Who Code, and introduce the new publishing program between Girls Who Code and Penguin Young Readers. Girls Who Code is dedicated to closing the gender gap in technology. The organization aims to reverse stereotypes that can be detrimental to girls about who becomes coders, encourages girls to strive to be brave rather than perfect, and provides entry points to coding and the computer sciences.

We’re delighted to be releasing GIRLS WHO CODE, read by author Reshma Saujani, and a new Girls Who Code fiction series:

The Friendship Code #1
Author: Stacia Deutsch and Reshma Saujani
Read By: Reshma Saujani and Sisi A. Johnson
LISTEN TO A CLIP: audio
Whether or not listeners are already interested in coding—and whether or not they’ve even heard of coding—THE FRIENDSHIP CODE is a genuinely fun listen. It’s like the The Baby-Sitters Club with a STEM twist. The main character, Lucy, joins a new after-school coding club. At first, she’s disappointed because she’s stuck in a work group with girls she barely knows, and she’s not quite sure she’s learning enough. Then, she begins getting cryptic coding messages that lead her to important discoveries. Recommended for ages 8-12
Girls Who Code
Author: Reshma Saujani
Read by: Reshma Saujani
LISTEN TO A CLIP: audio
For girls who think they might want to code, but have no idea where to start, look no further than the non-fiction book, GIRLS WHO CODE. Reshma narrates the audiobook in a clear, inspiring voice, and provides a general overview about what coding is and introduces some basic coding principles. She tells listeners real-life stories of girls who code and explains how coding can help you do what you love, regardless of what that is (fashion, sports, social justice, medicine, art—really, anything). Recommended for ages 10+

“This timely, well-written title is an excellent resource for budding coders; it bridges the wide gap between simple how-to guidebooks and complex coding textbooks.”—School Library Journal, starred review

*Statistics can be found at: https://girlswhocode.com/about-us/

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