Discussion Guide: Re Jane
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1. When Jane’s job at Lowood falls through, she goes straight back to working for her Uncle Sang after graduation. What prevents her from trying to find another job?

2. What does the interaction between Sam Surati and Beth tell you about Beth’s character?

3. Beth’s list of restricted foods affects everyone in the Mazer-Farley household, including Jane. What are some of the ways in which one character uses food as a means of controlling another?

4. Jane and Ed feel comfortable with one another, in part, because “we both came from decidedly unglamorous worlds, steeped in the language of vermin, water damage, building codes” (p. 73). Though coming from two different backgrounds, what similarities do they share in relation to their understanding of their identities?

5. Is Jane’s affair with Ed a bigger betrayal of Beth or of Devon? 

6. When Sang arrives shabbily dressed for a family dinner, Big Uncle is furious and makes them all leave the restaurant. In the elevator, he scolds Sang, saying, “Just stay quiet if you don’t know how things work” (p. 147). How did your feelings about this scene change after you learned that it was Sang and not Big Uncle who gave their father the money to invest in Gangnam real estate?

7. Why did Sang and Hannah withhold the truth about Jane’s parents?

8. On Nina’s first night in Seoul, Emo is furious at Jane for letting her friend come home alone while she stayed out with Changhoon. Do you agree with Emo’s criticism?

9. What do you think of the decisions Jane made with Changhoon and Ed, respectively? What does each man represent to Jane?

10. Every language has words or phrases like “nunchi” or “tap-tap-hae” that don’t have an exact equivalent in English. If you grew up speaking a language other than English, is there a similarly untranslatable word or phrase that informs your own life? How well does Park depict what it’s like to grow up a second-generation immigrant in America?

11. Re Jane is a retelling of Jane Eyre. How does Park echo Charlotte Brontë’s classic novel? How does she make the story her own?